Eagle Point

Eagle Point Colorado River Eagle Point Canyon Wall

Our first sightseeing stop was Eagle Point, so named for the landscape's resemblance to an eagle; an image that never quite manifested itself to me.

The locals invited us to view a traditional Hualapai ceremonial dance performed by members of the Hualapai tribe. The woman danced, wearing the clothing used in the ceremonies. It provided an interesting perspective into the culture and rituals that have been handed down through the generations.

Demonstration of a Hualapai Native American Dance
Demonstration of Native American Dance

Next was a guided tour of an authentic Indian village, with several examples of Southwest and Great Plains Indian architecture. It included Hualapai wickiups, tipis (teepees) and Navajo hogans. All of the structures and surrounding areas were built by each tribe with authentic materials, exactly those used for thousands of years. The tour could be done either with a guide or self guided and there was ample information provided on the construction and significance of each structure. The information as both interesting and informative.

Hualapai Tipi Dwelling Navajo Hogan Dwelling

The scenery was wonderful, but we had to be careful about walking too close to the edge, as there are no guard rails to prevent anyone from falling 4000+ feet to the bottom. To date no one has accidentally fallen, just a heads-up for caution.


Guano Point

Guano Point Mining Tram
Guano Point Mining Tram

During the 1950's and 60's, bat guano (dung) was mined from a cave across the canyon and trammed backed on cables. Rich in nitrates, it was used for the production of makeup, fertilizer and explosives. Some of the mining relics still exist and are very interesting.

Lunch is served here and we were able to dine at picnic tables outside under a large tarp. It was comforting to see the natives and workers also eating the same meals.

Here, we were able to do some hiking and discovery. By far, this was the highlight of the tour, and provided many perspectives of both the solitude and natural beauty of the Grand Canyon and Colorado River. As with the other sites, caution should be exercised as no fencing or railing is provided along the paths.

There were also many vendors offering handmade Hualapai Indian jewelry and art for sale. The prices seemed reasonable but are negotiable.

Guano Point Hiking Trail Guano Point Hiking Trail Guano Point Overlooking Colorado River


Hualapai Ranch & Quarter Master

Quarter Master Point Lookout
Quarter Master Canyon Lookout

If time permits, a ½ hour moderate walking tour can be requested for no charge. This is hosted on well defined trails and Scott can offer much information on the flora and fauna indigenous to the region.

Quarter Master Canyon serves as a tributary to the Colorado River. It is here, at the bottom, that the helicopter tours land.

An old western recreation town was erected in 2004 and offers a gift shop, restrooms and dining facilities. There are a few optional tours that can be purchased such as a horse-drawn wagon ride, horse back riding, ATV tours and off-road Hummer excursions.

Hualapai Ranch Old West Town
Hualapai Ranch Old West Town

Joshua Tree Forest

We passed the forest on the way up and stopped on the way back for picture taking. It is the largest and oldest collection of Joshua Trees in the world. Some trees have been dated to 900 years old.

Joshua Tree Forest
Joshua Tree Forest
900 Year Old Joshua Tree
900 Year Old Joshua Tree

Hoover Dam

Hoover Dam at Dusk
Hoover Dam at Dusk

The ride back to Las Vegas was comfortable and we stopped just before the Hoover Dam at a rest stop for snacks and a bathroom break. The bathroom facilities were Port-A-Potties and generally clean.

The views of the Hoover Dam were quite impressive and Scott discussed the construction goals and timeline for a new expansive trestle bridge that will serve as an alternate route to the Grand Canyon. This was not a tour of Hoover Dam, but an interesting distraction after a long day.